Space, the Final Frontier



"Space, the final frontier... To explore strange, new worlds; To seek out new life and new civilizations; To boldly go where no man has gone before…"


Ever since I was younger, I have always had a fascination with space. Just looking up and wondering what could possibly be out there.


I often tell my husband when watching things about space that I would jump on a spaceship in a heartbeat if I was offered a chance. Not because I want to escape from anything, but because I want to know more, I want to see more.


Luckily for me and my bank account, NASA has launched the James Webb Space Telescope. And we are FINALLY getting the first pictures of what is out beyond in space. You can get all the information about it here on their website.


The image above is from the Star-Forming Region: NGC 3324 In Carina Nebula.

This landscape of 'mountains' and 'valleys' speckled with glittering stars is actually the edge of a nearby, young, star-forming region called NGC 3324 in the Carina Nebula. Captured in infrared light by NASA's new James Webb Space Telescope, this image reveals for the first time previously invisible areas of star birth.
Called the Cosmic Cliffs, Webb's seemingly three-dimensional picture looks like craggy mountains on a moonlit evening. In reality, it is the edge of the giant, gaseous cavity within NGC 3324, and the tallest 'peaks' in this image are about 7 light-years high. The cavernous area has been carved from the nebula by the intense ultraviolet radiation and stellar winds from extremely massive, hot, young stars located in the center of the bubble, above the area shown in this image.

Deep Field: SMACS 0723
The image shows the galaxy cluster SMACS 0723 as it appeared 4.6 billion years ago. The combined mass of this galaxy cluster acts as a gravitational lens, magnifying much more distant galaxies behind it. Webb’s NIRCam has brought those distant galaxies into sharp focus – they have tiny, faint structures that have never been seen before, including star clusters and diffuse features. Researchers will soon begin to learn more about the galaxies’ masses, ages, histories, and compositions, as Webb seeks the earliest galaxies in the universe.

Interacting Galaxies: Stephan's Quintet
Stephan's Quintet, a visual grouping of five galaxies, is best known for being prominently featured in the holiday classic film, “It’s a Wonderful Life.” Today, NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope reveals Stephan’s Quintet in a new light. This enormous mosaic is Webb’s largest image to date, covering about one-fifth of the Moon’s diameter. It contains over 150 million pixels and is constructed from almost 1,000 separate image files. The information from Webb provides new insights into how galactic interactions may have driven galaxy evolution in the early universe.
With its powerful, infrared vision and extremely high spatial resolution, Webb shows never-before-seen details in this galaxy group. Sparkling clusters of millions of young stars and starburst regions of fresh star birth grace the image. Sweeping tails of gas, dust and stars are being pulled from several of the galaxies due to gravitational interactions. Most dramatically, Webb captures huge shock waves as one of the galaxies, NGC 7318B, smashes through the cluster.


Stellar Death: Planetary Nebula NGC 3132
The dimmer star at the center of this scene has been sending out rings of gas and dust for thousands of years in all directions, and NASA's James Webb Space Telescope has revealed for the first time that this star is cloaked in dust.

No matter whether you want to go into space or not, you can see these AMAZING images right from your own home online. Don't forget to visit www.jwst.nasa.gov to get all the information on this very cool mission.


 

Have a child that loves space?

Check out the books we have from beyond the stars!




 


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